Practical Electronics for Inventors, Third Edition

November 18, 2013 - Comment

THE ELECTRONICS KNOW-HOW YOU NEED TO BECOME A SUCCESSFUL INVENTOR “If there is a successor to Make: Electronics, then I believe it would have to be Practical Electronics for Inventors….perfect for an electrical engineering student or maybe a high school student with a strong aptitude for electronics….I’ve been anxiously awaiting this update, and it was

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THE ELECTRONICS KNOW-HOW YOU NEED TO BECOME A SUCCESSFUL INVENTOR

“If there is a successor to Make: Electronics, then I believe it would have to be Practical Electronics for Inventors….perfect for an electrical engineering student or maybe a high school student with a strong aptitude for electronics….I’ve been anxiously awaiting this update, and it was well worth the wait.”–GeekDad (Wired.com)

Spark your creativity and gain the electronics skills required to transform your innovative ideas into functioning gadgets. This hands-on, updated guide outlines electrical principles and provides thorough, easy-to-follow instructions, schematics, and illustrations. Find out how to select components, safely assemble circuits, perform error tests, and build plug-and-play prototypes. Practical Electronics for Inventors, Third Edition, features all-new chapters on sensors, microcontrollers, modular electronics, and the latest software tools.

Coverage includes: Resistors, capacitors, inductors, and transformers Diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits Optoelectronics, solar cells, and phototransistors Sensors, GPS modules, and touch screens Op amps, regulators, and power supplies Digital electronics, LCD displays, and logic gates Microcontrollers and prototyping platforms, including Arduino DC motors, RC servos, and stepper motors Microphones, audio amps, and speakers Modular electronics and prototyping

Comments

J. Fulmer says:

BEST Book Out There for Electronics I teach an introductory class in electronics at a small university. The class is intended for scientists, not electrical engineers; so the emphasis is on basic knowledge, practical troubleshooting skills, and design. I’ve used the Second Edition of this book a number of times with some satisfaction simply because the book covered most of what I needed. It was a great reference book for just about anything someone would want to know about electronics.However, there were some notable gaps in the Second Edition that I typically teach in an electronics class; specifically, I teach a section on transducers and microcontrollers. With the Third Edition, there are new sections on sensors (transducers) and microcontrollers, and now this book has everything in it that I could possibly want to teach. I’ve been using the Arduino for class the last couple of years because most scientists would use a microcontroller to design a piece of equipment instead of discrete gates and logic…

Georgia Green says:

Don’t get the Kindle edition! This is a wonderful book–5 star content–but the tables and diagrams are essential to its usability. The Kindle version ruins it by providing low-resolution images that become unreadable if you try to enlarge them even just to their original size.Buyers need to know the Kindle version is vastly inferior to the physical book. Amazon graciously allows a reversal of a Kindle purchase within 7 days. We reversed our purchase within the hour, but had we not immediately gone through the Kindle version and recognized the problem, we’d have wasted our money. Don’t waste yours.

Roy Ames says:

Best first book for Electronics I had a couple of electronics classes as part of my bachelors in Mechanical Engineering. We learned Kirkhoff’s rules and how to solve node mesh equations. The results were numbers though, not practical circuits. This book show how to use transistors, gates, op amps and microcontrollers. If you want to build a little circuit to run a robot or a sprinker system, you need to understand a few simple things like input/output impedances so that you don’t put more current though a device than it can handle. This book gives you this kind of understanding. It gives you what you need to turn datasheets into useful roadmaps for your projects… not a just set of numbers or equations but something that blinks, moves, or displays information.The other great book for me was “Art of Electronics” by Horowitz. With these two books and a few hundred hours or so making gadgets, you can be reasonably adept. Maybe not an electrical engineer, but well able to make basic robots, 3D printers and…

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