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November 18, 2013 - Comment

America’s most celebrated novelist, Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison extends her profound take on our history with this twentieth-century tale of redemption: a taut and tortured story about one man’s desperate search for himself in a world disfigured by war.Frank Money is an angry, self-loathing veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the

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America’s most celebrated novelist, Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison extends her profound take on our history with this twentieth-century tale of redemption: a taut and tortured story about one man’s desperate search for himself in a world disfigured by war.
Frank Money is an angry, self-loathing veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. His home may seem alien to him, but he is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from and that he’s hated all his life. As Frank revisits his memories from childhood and the war that have left him questioning his sense of self, he discovers a profound courage he had thought he could never possess again.
A deeply moving novel about an apparently defeated man finding his manhood—and his home.

Amazon Best Books of the Month, May 2012: It takes only a page or two of Home, Toni Morrison’s finely wrought 10th novel, before you find yourself relaxing into the hands of a master. Nobody owns a sentence like Ms. Morrison. Completely at ease in her craft, she spins slender, lyrical prose around a Korean War vet named Frank Money, who retreats into violent memories to escape his fractured present; his sister, Cee, abandoned by her husband and abused by a medical experiment; and the racial, economic, and emotional oppression fostered by their era and situation. In the understated act of saving Cee–he walks calmly into a house and removes her–Frank brings both of them full circle. Nursed by the local women who watched her grow up, Cee emerges robust and newly aware and, as Frank puts it, “mended.” If you pay attention, Home may quietly do the same for you. –Mia Lipman

Comments

Read-A-Lot says:

Wonderful! I read in a review that “Toni never puts language above story.” I agree with that statement 100%, and the prioritizing of story is on full display in Home. This is a short book, but very fertile. How can she pack so much, in so thin a volume. The themes she touches on, each could be a full novel on its’ own.Frank Money has returned from the Korean war, with a deep secret. He has covered this secret with mourning the lost of his two best friends, a “mourning..so thick it completely covered my shame.” Frank and his sister Cee were close growing up, he four years older than her, acted as a big brother should. And his going off to war created a physical separation, but not a division of affection.So, after the war and despite his struggling with post traumatic stress and using alcohol to self heal and exorcise the war demons, when he hears his sister is in danger, he does not hesitate to make his way toward her and…. To say more would give away too much…

Jsun says:

‘Come fast. She be dead if you tarry.’ “Frank and Cee, like some forgotten Hansel and Gretel, locked hands as they navigated the silence and tried to imagine a future.”Toni Morrison’s Home is a surprisingly lean novel from a major American author known for her complex and elliptical style. Home is even more lean and minimal than Morrison’s brilliant Sula, which she wrote forty years ago. For some reason, I yearned for the Morrison who wrote Song of Solomon or Paradise, which is Morrison at her most complex and perhaps her most sublime. That isn’t to say Home is a failed effort, but perhaps it’s a passive, more subdued effort, one which does not give us the feeling her greatest books have given us.Home tells the story of Frank Money and his experience “home” after The Korean War. He lost both his homeboys, Michael and Stuff, in the war. In a character reminiscent of Virginia Woolf’s Septimus Warren Smith or perhaps even Morrison’s own Shadrack, Money suffers re-adapting into American society. He…

ReadingWhileFemale says:

An Easy Introduction When I heard that Toni Morrison was coming out with a new novel, I was absolutely excited. I loved Paradise and Beloved (so much so that I’ve never written a review of either of them) so I pre-ordered a copy of Home as soon as I could. I got my copy yesterday (the release day) and I finished it this morning. I’m not entirely sure what I was expecting, but this novella was different altogether from any of my expectations.This novella was very different from other Morrison books that I’ve read. It was, first and foremost, easy to read. Beloved took me over a month to get through because it was so dense and so difficult; Home took me only a few hours. I was, I have to admit, a little surprised and even disappointed at how easy the prose was. Though the chapters switch between narrators, with a majority of the chapters being from Frank’s perspective, the narrators of each chapter are always characters that have been previously introduce and are always identified in the first…

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