Home Widescreen DVD

November 18, 2013 - Comment

Experience the wonderment of our world in a way that will enthrall, captivate and inspire you! Award-winning aerial photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand and narrator Glenn Close take you on a spectacular voyage around the world in Home, a unique film with such breathtaking imagery, you’ll want to enjoy it time and time again. Former actor Yann

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Experience the wonderment of our world in a way that will enthrall, captivate and inspire you! Award-winning aerial photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand and narrator Glenn Close take you on a spectacular voyage around the world in Home, a unique film with such breathtaking imagery, you’ll want to enjoy it time and time again. Former actor Yann Arthus-Bertrand directed this visually astonishing portrait of the Earth as seen from mesmerizing aerial views. Home is not the first documentary to survey our planet from the air, but Arthus-Bertrand brilliantly and dreamily captures the miraculous linkage within delicate eco-systems. For viewers whose eyes glaze over at descriptions of the way Earth recycles energy and matter, Home underscores the beautiful and awesome reality of that complex process. Narrated by actress Glenn Close (in this English-language version), Home begins by exploring and clarifying the natural history of water, sunlight, and the role simple life-forms such as algae played (and still play) in making the planet hospitable to more evolved, living things. As the film moves along, it also has a way of rebooting one’s lazy assumptions about familiar phenomena. The Grand Canyon, for example, might be a fantastic sight to behold, but it’s also a collection of billions and billions of shells compressed under Earth’s oceans long ago. The carbon trapped in the Grand Canyon was drained from the atmosphere, helping–once again–oxygen-dependent life to develop.

Similarly, plant life, Home tells us, broke up the water molecule and released oxygen into the atmosphere. Everything is linked, everything is part of a grand machine–the film makes this clear in scores of ways, and not just by telling us. Arthus-Bertrand reveals the intricate, breathtaking designs and patterns of glaciers feeding rivers, of animals feeding on plant life so more plant life can grow, of Australia’s great Coral Reef’s role in keeping the ocean in eco-balance. Of course, a big part of the story is the impact short-sighted humans have on these systems: the way we overfish, or drain deserts of scarce fossil water, or turn non-farming lands into perverse engines for agriculture. There is much to be alarmed at watching Home, but there is much to move one as well. –Tom Keogh

Comments

foxfire1013 says:

Stunning! This is a magnificent production. I’m now watching it on the National Geographic channel and had to check to see if a DVD was available. No commercials to interrupt the thread!The photography is stunning, the music enjoyably fitting and the narrator’s voice smooth and clear. The story is informative, sad and scary.Yes, this production conveys the message that the current economic model of consumption is not conducive to long-term survival (in the manner to which we have become accustomed) where a secure supply of uncontaminated food/water and adequate shelter/clothing are a given.Sometimes “a picture is worth a thousand words”.

L Gontzes says:

Educational and an Eye-Opener! Home is an excellent documentary which aims to familiarize us with our planet while reminding us of our place and responsibilities vis-à-vis our environment.The amount of effort and research put into this project is evident and as a result the documentary helps transport the viewer to different locations allowing one to lay eyes on natural wonders and disasters alike. Glenn Close does an amazing job narrating in a way that brings to mind the Lords of the Rings, while the photography is simply breathtaking!In short, Home is a must-see documentary, strongly recommended to those people that do care about the legacy they leave behind for the generations to come. 5 Stars

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