How Music Works

November 18, 2013 - Comment

How Music Works is David Byrne’s buoyant celebration of a subject he has spent a lifetime thinking about. Drawing on his work over the years with Talking Heads, Brian Eno, and myriad collaborators—along with journeys to Wagnerian opera houses, African villages, and anywhere music exists—Byrne shows how music emerges from cultural circumstance as much as

Buy Now! $68.66Amazon.com Price
(as of June 23, 2017 10:49 pm UTC - Details)

How Music Works is David Byrne’s buoyant celebration of a subject he has spent a lifetime thinking about. Drawing on his work over the years with Talking Heads, Brian Eno, and myriad collaborators—along with journeys to Wagnerian opera houses, African villages, and anywhere music exists—Byrne shows how music emerges from cultural circumstance as much as individual creativity. It is his magnum opus, and an impassioned argument about music’s liberating, life-affirming power.Amazon Best Books of the Month, September 2012: It’s no surprise that David Byrne knows his music. As the creative force behind Talking Heads and many solo and collaborative ventures, he’s been writing, playing, and recording music for decades. What is surprising is how well his voice translates to the page. In this wide-ranging, occasionally autobiographical analysis of the evolution and inner workings of the music industry, Byrne explores his own deep curiosity about the “patterns in how music is written, recorded, distributed, and received.” He is an opinionated and well-educated tour guide, and the resulting essays–on topics from rockers’ clothes to the role of the turntable, concert stages to recording studios–will give you an entirely new perspective on the complex journey a song takes from conception to your iPod. –Neal Thompson

Comments

Dr. Debra Jan Bibel "World Music Explorer" says:

Musical Musings: A Hodge-Podge Byrne begins his wide-ranging historical, technological, psychological and sociological examination of music with a novel insight: architecture of musical venues shape composition and instrumental arrangements. Regarding huge gothic cathedrals, intimate nightclubs, and jungle camp sites, room reverberation, volume of space, and audience vocal ambience dictate modal versus scale works, instrument development, and performance dynamics. The great revolutionary divide was recording technology, and musicians discovered that what works live does not necesarily achieve the same result on vinyl, tape, CD, or .mp3, and vice versa. Expectations often lead to disappointment and the performance and performer suffers. With such an interesting introduction, the book offers much promise. It almost fulfills expectations with both personal and general tidbits and theses that reward the reader, though for myself his personal examples are somewhat weaker.The second chapter is an musical…

David M. Scott "David Meerman Scott" says:

Terrific book for music lovers and content creators alike This is David Byrne week for me. On Sunday, I caught the sensational David Byrne and St. Vincent show at the Orpheum Theater in Boston. The last time I saw Byrne live was when I caught the Talking Heads on August 19, 1983 at the old Forrest Hills Tennis Stadium in New York City. So, clearly I was already a Byrne fan.How Music WorksThe other part of David Byrne week is his fabulous new book How Music Works. The book is Byrne’s take on the industry he’s succeeded in. He offers keen observations about the music industry, the art of making music, telling stories in the book using a combination of history, anthropology, and music theory. I love this book!In particular, Byrne has a fascinating take on the development of music, which is quite different from what other music historians say. In a chapter titled “Creation in Reverse” he argues that music evolves to fill the space where it is performed.For example, the Talking Heads evolved in the…

stutron says:

For music geeks by a music geek Let me begin by saying I wouldn’t consider myself a David Byrne/Talking Heads fan. I deeply admire and respect Mr. Byrne as an artist and he would be the kind of person I could listen to ramble on hours about music. Well, this is the closest I’ll ever get to that conversation. Be forewarned, those looking for a tell-all about his time with Talking Heads or as a solo musician will be generally disappointed, I found his personal anecdotes generally the weakest part of the book. This did not make me want to rediscover his works the way Keith Richards’ Life had me digging through every Rolling Stones record ever made.What this book offers are fascinating musings, anecdotes and his personal thoughts (infused with his dry wit) on music that made it difficult to put the book down for any length of time. The writer of Psycho Killer discusses psychoacoustics (the study of how the brain perceives sounds), how Bing Crosby’s love for golf advanced recording technology, and how…

Write a comment