The Ultimate History of Video Games: From Pong to Pokemon–The Story Behind the Craze That Touched Our Lives and Changed the World

November 18, 2013 - Comment

Inside the Games You Grew Up with but Never ForgotWith all the whiz, bang, pop, and shimmer of a glowing arcade. The Ultimate History of Video Games reveals everything you ever wanted to know and more about the unforgettable games that changed the world, the visionaries who made them, and the fanatics who played them.

Buy Now! $14.10Amazon.com Price
(as of December 10, 2017 2:49 pm UTC - Details)

Inside the Games You Grew Up with but Never Forgot
With all the whiz, bang, pop, and shimmer of a glowing arcade. The Ultimate History of Video Games reveals everything you ever wanted to know and more about the unforgettable games that changed the world, the visionaries who made them, and the fanatics who played them. From the arcade to television and from the PC to the handheld device, video games have entraced kids at heart for nearly 30 years. And author and gaming historian Steven L. Kent has been there to record the craze from the very beginning.
This engrossing book tells the incredible tale of how this backroom novelty transformed into a cultural phenomenon. Through meticulous research and personal interviews with hundreds of industry luminaries, you’ll read firsthand accounts of how yesterday’s games like Space Invaders, Centipede, and Pac-Man helped create an arcade culture that defined a generation, and how today’s empires like Sony, Nintendo, and Electronic Arts have galvanized a multibillion-dollar industry and a new generation of games. Inside, you’ll discover:
·The video game that saved Nintendo from bankruptcy
·The serendipitous story of Pac-Man’s design
·The misstep that helped topple Atari’s $2 billion-a-year empire
·The coin shortage caused by Space Invaders
·The fascinating reasons behind the rise, fall, and rebirth of Sega
·And much more!
Entertaining, addictive, and as mesmerizing as the games it chronicles, this book is a must-have for anyone who’s ever touched a joystick.

Comments

Miketheratguy says:

Outstanding. Extremely informative and deep. I’ve been playing video games for 20 years now. I began with the Atari, saw the market crash, grew up with Nintendo, and got caught up in the 90’s proliferation of newer and hotter systems. I know a great deal about the industry, yet this book puts my knowledge to shame.Exhaustively researched and crammed ridiculously full of information, anecdotes, and hundreds of direct quotes from every walk of video game life, this book is worth more than one read-through. My copy is well-worn because I find it so easy to take with me on plane trips and just start reading through at random points. It’s written in a very friendly, conversational tone and engages you with its prose. The book is extremely interesting because the author is clearly interested in the subject himself. He manages to get the kind of details and answer the type of questions you’d want to know, yet stays very thorough and accurate throughout.Loads of different subjects are covered, sometimes at great…

M. S. Hillis says:

A history of Atari, plus some other stuff This is really two books in one. The first half is a detailed history of the rise and fall of Atari. It is chock full of interesting details, and rightly focuses on the fascinating personalities who drove the company that did more than any other to take video games mainstream. The author’s years of covering the industry and these people paid dividends in this section.

Dan Amrich says:

Lives up to its name–a must-read Combine Leonard Herman’s accurate but dry Phoenix with the intimacy of David Sheff’s Game Over and you’ve got The Ultimate History of Video Games, the best account of video game history to date. Numerous anecdotes from the people who made the games that made history–from Atari’s Al Alcorn and Nolan Bushnell through to Square’s Hironobu Sakaguchi and Sony’s Kaz Hirai–give the book an personal, friendly tone. Gamers should note that this is a reprinted but noticably improved version of Kent’s self-published The First Quarter, with a full index, more photographic examples, a more attractive layout, and the removal of all the confusing typos and minor errors (sadly, the original book’s clever title was removed as well, but the amended facts are worth it). Ultimate History’s conversational tone, broad scope, and authoritative direct quotes make it very compelling as a narrative but just as useful as a reference. Along with David Sheff’s Game Over, it’s an entertaining must-read for…

Write a comment